Challenger Brands: A Look Back, to Look Forward

Challenger Brands: A Look Back, to Look Forward

Challenger Brands: A Look Back, to Look Forward

Over the years, Seurat Group’s Challenger Brand studies identified many practices of winning Challenger Brands. However, one characteristic rises above the others among successful Challenger Brands, which is a relentless drive to delight the consumer. This is the secret sauce a challenger utilizes to develop and provide a unique and compelling value proposition to consumers. Today, we step back to highlight two brands from previous Challenger Brand studies that distinguished themselves by delighting consumers in ways overlooked by traditional brands. We see this process play out time and again as Challenger Brands are founded and flourish in categories where incumbents become disconnected from the needs of their consumers.

NUUN
How did it all begin?

When Nuun was founded in 2004 consumer attention in the beverage category was increasingly turning to the prevalence of sugar in products. Athletes in particular craved solutions that hydrated them without excess sugar and additives, but were primarily faced with choosing between traditional branded options that combined hydration benefits with high calories. By identifying this consumer tension, Nuun created a new hydration solution separating “electrolyte replacement from carbohydrates.” While they were immediately accepted by hardcore athletes, Nuun was quick to realize this healthy hydrating beverage was something that a broader universe of consumers desired. We highlighted the steps they took in our 2016 Challenger Brand study as they used everyday ambassadors to drive growth by demonstrating that healthy hydration was available to everyone – not just athletes.

What unmet consumer needs has the brand continued to solve?

Targeting recovery & rest: Nuun has continued to solve health-conscious consumers’ needs within the hydration space. In February of 2019, Nuun launched Nuun Rest. Vishal Patel, Nuun’s senior head of R&D, framed the move as a new approach to recovery products saying that a lot are “protein based.” Nuun “wanted to take a different route and include some minerals that take you in a direction of more restful relaxation.” The brand was able to stand out as they zeroed in on specific product benefits their consumers were drawn to. Nuun continued this theme of distinct and purposeful product delivery in 2021 when they sought to expand into providing its users with clean, lasting energy with Nuun Energy. Unlike many incumbent products that were loaded with long ingredient lists and excess sugar, the brand looked to offer consumers an alternative that was non-GMO verified, vegan, gluten-free and kosher. These product expansions further differentiated the brand for their consumers.

Where are they now?

Nuun recently entered into an agreement to be acquired by Nestlé later this year. The brand is a major player in the healthy hydration space and is poised for additional growth due to their continued commitment to delight the modern consumer, consistent with their “challenger roots.”

LILY’S
How did it all begin?

For generations of consumers, chocolate has been a delicious indulgence. It’s something consumers love, but many struggle with the guilt that comes after partaking in a treat. The founders of Lily’s Sweets understood this basic tension well, and the brand was created on the premise that consumers should be able to enjoy delicious chocolate without a serving of guilt. Lily’s accomplished this and stood out from other brands in the category by giving consumers a delicious sweet treat without the sugar. In our 2019 Challenger Brand study, we highlighted Lily’s for their ability to carve out a unique competitive edge. They provide an indulgent and guilt-free chocolate experience all while operating within guidelines of fair-trade certifications and by using plant-based sugar substitutes.

What unmet consumer needs has the brand continued to solve?

Lily’s expands the sugar reduction movement: Founder Cynthia Tice has a clear brand strategy in mind that Lily’s is, “a leader in the sugar reduction movement, here to help limit your overall sugar intake while working to give you sweets you’ll obsess over.” COVID provided opportunities for the brand to delight consumers in new ways. As the pandemic caused the country to shut down, consumers were grazing and treating themselves at a higher rate. In fact, 46% of adults said they snacked more during the pandemic and the top driver of this was a desire for comfort. Lily’s capitalized on this trend and launched products to meet this elevated consumer need. In January of 2020, the brand launched milk chocolate caramel popcorn for those family movie nights amidst the lockdown. In June, they continued to innovate and target consumers who were increasingly baking at home, launching white chocolate and chocolate-caramel baking chips.

Where are they now?

Lily’s attention to consumer needs within the broader snacking category allowed them to branch into new occasions and reach new heights of success. The brand recently entered into an agreement to be acquired by The Hershey Company. The acquisition was an acknowledgement of Lily’s ability to delight the consumer, with Lily’s CEO Jane Miller noting that by “joining Hershey’s family of brands, Lily’s will become a platform confection brand making BFY options easily accessible to all consumers.”

By remaining relentlessly connected to the emerging needs of consumers in their categories, both Nuun and Lily’s highlight how Challenger Brands succeed and flourish when focused on that secret sauce. Do other brands come to mind that have done the same? We welcome conversation at info@seuratgroup.com.
2021: Planning for Post-Pandemic Growth

2021: Planning for Post-Pandemic Growth

2021: Planning for Post-Pandemic Growth

From Passive to Purposeful Growth
2020 was a record year for many in the CPG industry as many categories passively benefitted from favorable growth drivers shaped by the COVID-19 pandemic. Many of these drivers – the dollar shift from foodservice back to grocery, the uptick in at-home cooking and baking, the increase in disinfecting and cleaning behavior at home and on the go – represented the largest sources of industry revenue and consumption growth. Leading brands in these spaces benefitted tremendously from this.

In 2021, these brands have the opportunity to make the increased consumer engagement and spending “stick” – that is, to delight and capture new-found consumer loyalty through this year’s demand plan choices and investments.

Proactive planning to align with large growth drivers is critical because while brands may continue to ride the wave of growth fueled by pandemic-influenced behavioral changes from last year, the shift is already part of the new baseline this year. These changes could also revert faster than anticipated, requiring companies to be out ahead of changes in consumer behavior. Brands must purposefully find the next wave(s) – or risk being left behind.

A scan of the landscape of categories and growth drivers reveals five growth drivers where we believe consumer behavior will evolve this year, and where brands should purposefully connect with consumers to capture new consumption and revenue growth. While other trends that gained traction pre-COVID will continue to emerge, such as convenience and sustainability, we focus here on the drivers that will have outsize impact after COVID-19 and therefore require brands to think differently. We recommend looking at your business through the lens of these drivers to inform this year’s annual planning cycle as outlined in the scorecard for evaluating growth strategy shifts below.

Growth Drivers

1. Togetherness

The Driver: As in-person socialization becomes possible again, consumers will place renewed value on enjoying life’s experiences together with friends and loved ones, with a desire to make these small, everyday moments of connection even more meaningful.

How to Win: Brands and retailers should partner to provide relevant solutions tailored to these new occasions, supported by communication and influence points that highlight the role of their solutions in bringing people together.

Example: The outdoor grilling occasion is positioned to expand beyond holidays and weekends into a dinner with friends and family meal replacement. With the briquet or gas grill as the centering staple, there is room for many categories to participate in creating lasting memories with family and friends through the grilling occasion.

2. Wellness

The Driver: With health and wellness top of mind for consumers, wellness has shifted away from rigid routines and toward a fluid and personalized approach. Across food, fitness and health categories, consumers are experimenting to find what works best for their bodies and lifestyles, creating a spectrum of different wellness needs. For some consumers, the priority on wellness simply means swapping in “one step healthier” alternatives, while others on the leading-edge have tapped into personalized products to optimize physical and mental health.

 

How to Win: Map and size where your brand plays within this wellness curve. Track your consumer target’s evolving values and behaviors to earn their loyalty as their wellness routine evolves.

Example: The sugar-free cookie segment has emerged on the “one step better” side of the spectrum, driving growth through brands that offer a tasty yet health-conscious option within a typically indulgent category.

3. Search for Value

The Driver: Consumers continue to tighten their budgets and increase their personal savings rate to prepare for financial uncertainty, forcing trade-offs in spending across the store. As a result, consumers will seek value even in traditionally ‘premium’ categories.

How to Win: Look for the space within your category where value presents dimensions that are important to a sizable segment of consumers and evaluate the potential for your brand to stretch into these spaces while maintaining premium equity.

Example: The cleaning and disinfecting category delivers across the value spectrum, with leading brands such as Clorox offering high-value propositions through their core bleach products while also stretching into premium offerings through value-added forms like sprays, wipes, tablets and tools.

4. Indulgence

The Driver: Hand in hand with the rise of personalized wellness, indulgence will become increasingly acceptable as consumers prioritize balance and happiness over strict regimens and endless sacrifice. Rather than viewing indulgence as a negative “cheat” or guilt trip to be avoided, consumers will invest in the foods, beverages, and activities that make them happy, especially those that can be shared with family and friends.

How to Win: Identify the indulgent moments to delight within your category and cater communication to emphasize permissibility.

Example: In the ready-to-drink space, new functional beverages are combining health attributes with indulgent characteristics. For example, OLIPOP’s sparkling tonic offers digestive health benefits while still allowing consumers to enjoy the indulgent taste of their favorite sodas, like root beer and cola.

5. Personal Protection

The Driver: Self-care has shifted into the consumer’s hands. Rather than simply depending on health care systems, consumers are prioritizing personal ways to maintain safety in their environments and building new routines around cleaning and disinfection that will endure beyond the current pandemic.

How to Win: Offer solutions that build peace of mind for consumers seeking protection across all facets of their lives, whether in the home or in shared spaces like public transportation and workspaces. Stand out with a creative route to market (e.g., placement in airplanes, gyms, public transit).

Example: As disinfecting behavior becomes fluid across in- and out-of-home, there is opportunity for brands to connect to the holistic need for personal safety. For example, disinfecting brands like Lysol have partnered with the hospitality and transportation industries to establish new safety protocols and place branded solutions within reach in shared spaces like lobbies and airplane seats.

Summary
It is imperative to wire your business plans from consumer growth drivers and place time, focus and money on the activities that will yield the greatest growth and return. We wish you success in the new year and hope this scorecard provides inspiration on new, purposeful avenues for growth.
Scorecard for Your Brand

Objective: Purposefully shift to where consumer behavior will trend in your spaces to participate in growth in 2021

Winning with Insights in the Next Normal

Winning with Insights in the Next Normal

Winning with Insights in the Next Normal

Introduction

Long-held beliefs about the CPG industry have been flipped on their head since consumers rushed to stockpile essentials in March to deal with COVID concerns and restrictions. Big legacy brands, long seen as destined for permanent decline while smaller challenger brands drive growth, have enjoyed double-digit growth as consumers prioritize familiar staples and non-perishables. In just one example of a major reversal, canned soup sales jumped 26% after years of decline.

In response, Big CPG has optimistically declared that it is “back”. ConAgra CEO Sean Connolly said of the company’s sauce and frozen foods portfolio, “Products like ours are getting levels of trial that were not anticipated and that could turn into consistent users over time.”

However, as consumer needs evolve beyond dealing with immediate COVID-19 impacts, future growth is not guaranteed—or straightforward to predict. Looking ahead, canned soup demand is expected to soften to its previous trajectory. Meanwhile, other categories are poised to take a different course: translating COVID-19-induced sales spikes into sustained growth by tapping into long-term consumer trends.

 

Example: Canned Soup Projected Revenue Growth

In order to realize transformational, enduring growth from consumer changes initially sparked or accelerated by COVID-19, it is critical for brands to take a consumer-first approach, developing predictive insight to understand how consumer needs will continue to evolve and what this means for their categories in the Next Normal.

Consumer Behavior Model
Is your brand’s growth a result of pandemic panic, or tapping a long-term growth driver?

We take a structured, consumer first approach to understand how needs and demand have been impacted by COVID-19, and better predict which will be “sticky.”

Applying the approach across categories reveals opportunities for brands and retailers to better meet consumer needs and clarifies which opportunities will endure in the Next Normal.

How should brands and retailers respond?

It is important for brands and retailers to use forward-looking insights to understand why consumers are making decisions and anticipate how their needs will evolve in the Next Normal.

Brands and retailers should take the following steps to capture consumer demand in the next normal:

1. Map your brand’s value equation: Identify whether it will remain relevant in addressing underlying consumer needs & pain points beyond immediate COVID impact

2. Learn from the leading edge: Know which consumers represent the future of your category and prominently feature them in your research efforts

3. Stay connected: Continue to track consumer behavior & attitudes closely as they evolve; talk to consumers about their anticipated changes

4. Keep your eye on the horizon: Build conviction in where your category is headed, and don’t let short-term disruption sway long-term strategy

Reach out to the Seurat Group for additional information on ways to build the forward-looking insight foundation and organizational conviction needed to support strategies that delight consumers in the Next Normal.

7 Habits of Highly Effective Innovators

7 Habits of Highly Effective Innovators

7 Habits of Highly Effective Innovators

Lately it seems innovation has earned its own 24-hour news cycle.

Corporate earnings reports and mission statements are littered with the term, and it’s perpetually the topic of books, newsletters, blogs, LinkedIn articles, moderated panels and industry conferences. A Google search for CPG innovation returned more than 5.7 million results. And yet, despite the vast amounts of time spent researching, analyzing, and pontificating about innovation, the CPG industry – big CPG, in particular – has a woefully poor track record.

Harvard Business School professor Clay Christensen famously estimated that of the more than 30,000 new products introduced every year, 95% of them fail1. A large study of the packaged food industry found that only 25% of new products were still around four years after launch2. By some estimates, as much as $35 billion is spent annually on failed innovation.

What gives?

Plenty of industry veterans have conducted post-mortems on CPG innovation, and most cite some combination of risk aversion, unrealistic goal setting, slow product development cycles, insufficient sales & marketing support, and general bureaucracy. We could add to the list – missing a human insight, over-relying on market intelligence, failing to plan for commercial viability – but in the end it’s easier to point the finger than articulate how to innovate successfully. Over the years Seurat Group has benchmarked hundreds of brands, from emerging challengers to billion-dollar blockbusters. We recently conducted an analysis to identify why certain innovation succeeds and identified seven habits of highly effective innovators.

For many CPG brands, innovation is a foregone conclusion – a templated box on the annual plan – rather than a deliberate strategic choice. But the most successful innovators are those who take a much more purposeful approach. That means starting by clarifying the role of innovation within the company. (Are you trying to increase household penetration? Participate in more “jobs”?) A sharp innovation strategy also articulates a clear financial goal. (Should innovation drive 5% of growth or 50%?) Answers to these questions are of critical importance in driving organizational alignment and decision-making.

Drinks on a shelf

A ready-to-drink nutrition manufacturer had a hero SKU accounting for roughly 90% of sales. The team saw that the core product was driving household penetration but servicing a very limited range of consumption occasions. Thus, their innovation strategy became about driving buy rate and extending to new jobs. A financial goal of $100MM in incremental sales within three years ensured the team stayed focused on big ideas and had clear metrics to evaluate success.

In many cases, innovation is regrettably fueled by capability rather than insight. Product designers and
engineers, eager to pounce on the latest advancements, are all too willing to use some new technology, process and/or capability to justify innovation – often with little regard for the end user. Consider the curved panel TV, debuted with great fanfare in 2013. Samsung, Sony and LG were eager to get in the game, excited by what promised to be a revolution in the viewing experience – only to have it widely panned as a gimmick. Why? Curved panel innovation stemmed from access to a new technology, not user research; the claims about a more immersive experience were simply to post-rationalize and justify an exorbitant price premium. As one ex-Samsung employee put it, “they were borne out of a capability, not a user need.” Similar examples abound in CPG, from product formulations to packaging technology and other novel advancements.

In addition to being strong general managers, the best innovators are experts in consumer behavior. They are not only dialed into the needs of consumers, but also actively evaluating how those needs are evolving to ensure innovation designs for the future, not the past 52 weeks.

When conducting research with leading-indicator consumers, belVita found consumers were “hacking” breakfast foods to feel more energized and sated without being weighed down. The insight drove Modelez to formulate its breakfast biscuits with “slow-release carbs,” communicating “4 hours of nutritious steady energy” in its marketing. belVita continues to find impressive, consistent growth in an otherwise struggling category as the brand blows by annual sales of over $350MM3.

Most new products wind up as line extensions or variants that are different but not necessarily better. By contrast, the most successful innovators recognize the importance of elevating the value equation – in other words, identifying areas where existing products can be improved. While that can occur in the denominator (i.e., providing the same benefit at a lower cost), more often it manifests in the numerator, either through (1) solving pain points or (2) creating delight opportunities. To do this well, innovators identify a clear foil: an incumbent whose value proposition they can meaningfully disrupt and from whom they can source volume.

In 2019, Smucker’s Uncrustables was humming along, a nearly $300MM business4 built on taking the effort out of no-crust PB&J sandwiches for kid lunchboxes and other on-the-go occasions. In 2020, along came Chubby Organics, directly attacking Uncrustables with its nut butter & superfood sandwiches marketed this way: “Chubby Organics offers the same indulgent sandwich experience as the leading PB&J brand, but we swapped out the JUNK ingredients so you can eat our good-for-you sandwiches without the guilt5.” With ingredients like chia seeds, Medjool dates and camu camu, Superfood Sandwiches may not be for everyone – but for those who prioritize a cleaner panel, they represent a significant improvement in the value equation – and enable Chubby to command a ~7x price premium6.

Plenty of brands do the hard work of mining legitimate consumer insights and identifying attractive profit
pools – only to fall down in understanding their right to win. Enticed by the next “bright shiny object,” brand leaders are quick to extend into new spaces without regard for where they can have a unique advantage. Burt’s Bees did a commendable job building equity in natural skin care – and then in 2016, overextended with a fumbled launch into pea protein powder. As one former Clorox leader reflected, “We had built this great equity in natural ingredients, but consumers knew us for skin care, not protein.”

The best innovators scrutinize why consumers choose their brand over others, and where the brand over-delivers relative to alternatives. Thinking this way allows for purposeful exploration of innovation spaces that build upon a brand’s unique right to win.

Kodiak cakes, best known for its protein-packed flapjack and waffle mix, has nearly doubled sales every year and is on its way to being a $100MM+ brand7. By building empathy for its most loyal users, Kodiak discovered its right to win wasn’t protein – a major packaging call-out and often-cited purchase driver – but rather convenient, nutrient-dense breakfast. Thinking that way enabled the team to explore a host of product categories and executions, and ultimately inspired the launch of toaster-ready waffles and microwaveable flapjack cups – both of which improve on the convenience and portability of the signature mix8.

Several companies have built successful businesses helping manufacturers evaluate new product concepts and gauge “launch readiness.” Unfortunately, in addition to being extremely expensive, these testing methods are limited in that they (1) tend to place outsized weight in stated interest and purchase intent (how many respondents say they are ‘interested’ and/or would ‘probably buy’); (2) lean heavily on historical benchmarks, which can be notoriously inaccurate for new-to-world products; and (3) are highly sensitive to manufacturer-provided inputs (e.g., projected % ACV). By contrast, great innovators take a more holistic – and flexible – approach to evaluating innovation.

A global beverage manufacturer was exploring ways to drive category penetration through innovation across its portfolio of brands. After using ethnographies to identify consumer pain points and develop hypothesized innovation platforms, the company fielded a quant study to validate and prioritize opportunities. In addition to asking about purchase intent, the study probed on brand fit, expected purchase frequency, projected incrementality and willingness to pay a premium over existing products. The resulting data, when layered with category analytics, enabled the team to scorecard each platform holistically and prioritize innovation spaces. To further refine the propositions, the manufacturer tested different versions of Facebook ads to gauge consumer responses to packaging design and pricing – all before R&D began the product development process.

Many CPG companies struggle when it comes to commercializing innovation, in part due to what is
frequently a linear, sequential process. In a typical situation, a marketing and/or insights lead partners with an outside agency to commission a study. Results are then presented to marketing, which spins a story and briefs a product development team, which then enlists supply chain, finance, legal and other stakeholders to make the product a reality. At that point, some poor soul is sent off to pitch the idea to sales and obtain a volume forecast. This process leads to inefficiencies and encourages a “CYA” mentality. By contrast, the most successful innovators recognize it takes a village to raise a new product and wire for success by engaging cross-functional stakeholders early and often – and providing ample opportunities for feedback and iteration.

A large dairy manufacturer set out to build a long-term innovation pipeline with the goal of reigniting interest in a declining category. Notably, the project was managed by a cross-functional team with representation from insights, sales, marketing, R&D, finance, supply chain and project management. When it came time to prioritize concepts, there was no need to “get sales on board” or “ask supply chain if they could actually produce it.” Leaders from each department had been heavily involved throughout, making commercialization smoother and integrating seamlessly into the annual planning process.

Another common innovation pitfall is relying too much on existing models and capabilities. Big CPG companies spend countless years and dollars building scale and efficiency, ultimately creating perverse incentives to blindly leverage those efficiencies when new models are needed. Consider Campbell’s Sauces, a modern take on the category General Mills pioneered with Hamburger Helper in the 1970s. While the insight territory is rich – consumers want convenient solutions that work with existing tools (skillets, slow cookers) to make dinner easier – Campbell’s lacked the conviction to challenge its go-to-market model, leaving retailers to decide where to shelve the products. Today the bulk of the brand’s website is dedicated to explaining to consumers where to find the items at every major retailer: Microwaveable Meals at Acme, Marinades & Sauces at Giant Eagle, etc.9

By contrast, the sharpest innovators flex the go-to-market model to best suit consumer and customer needs. Think of it as capital ‘I’ vs. little ‘i’ innovation. Examples include:

Licensing: Leading household product licensers capture upwards of 5% of their revenue from licensing and partnership strategies

Direct to Consumer: Blueland, the makers of environmentally sustainable cleaning products, have leveraged a DTC model to enter five household categories within the first 15 months of selling

Community Selling: Leading beauty & personal care brands use consultants and the 1:1 interaction of community selling to recognize virtually overnight success with new products – in stark contrast to the slow and steady model of building awareness and trial in traditional retail channels

Influencer channels: An increasing number of brands are curating breakthrough innovation in authentic channels where target consumers can more easily discover it. Oatly launched first in Intelligentsia coffee, building credibility with baristas and creating awareness among coffee enthusiasts. Similarly, for years RXBAR sold exclusively through CrossFit gyms, rapidly iterating on the product and packaging before finally entering Natural Grocery.

Ready to rethink your approach to strategic innovation? Contact us as info@seuratgroup.com.

Winning Omnichannel in the Next Normal

Winning Omnichannel in the Next Normal

Winning Omnichannel in the Next Normal

Does your organization have a strategy to gain share in an omnichannel environment turned upside-down by COVID-19?

A significant shift occurred in the consumer packaged goods industry over the past few years as leading organizations adopted an omnichannel approach to consumer demand generation and selling. These companies moved away from a siloed, ‘push’ approach to mass marketing and acknowledged the realities of a complex consumer / shopper journey along with the need to make brand connections in a more relevant, meaningful way. Those that made the shift realized significant growth as the majority of industry growth shifted to sources outside the traditional brick and mortar world.

COVID-19 heightened the importance of taking an omnichannel view as consumer points of influence and purchase rapidly shift. It also revealed the need to re-visit what we mean by the term omnichannel, given three new realities:

1. Omnichannel is bigger than we thought
2. Consumer / shopper journeys are dynamic and rapidly changing
3. Last year’s playbook no longer applies

Omnichannel is bigger than we thought

Do you know where your core consumer personas are making brand decisions and shopping? That question is increasingly difficult to answer, as the majority of CPG spending now falls outside of ‘traditional’ sources tracked by syndicated data.

Both brands and retailers now compete against a broader set of options that threaten to supplant their offerings with more compelling value propositions. A broader framing also makes it increasingly difficult to influence consumers as they move along the purchase journey.

Example: Functional Water

Brands and retailers must recognize that consumers do not think in terms of ‘channels.’ The imperative is to conduct regular, far-reaching assessments of where and how consumer personas are fulfilling their needs—or risk losing market share to unseen or untracked competitors.

Consumer/shopper journeys are dynamic and rapidly changing

Consumers are changing more quickly than ever. Gone are the days when brand owners and retailers could comfortably develop annual plans followed by a period focused on execution. The disruption and changes ushered in by COVID provide an important lesson on the need to adapt quickly.

While COVID is clearly disruptive, brands and retailers need to be vigilant and agile at all times. For example, the Pet category experienced tremendous change when Chewy.com and Amazon provided a much more compelling total value equation for pet parents that caught many brands and retailers flat-footed.

Brand owners and retailers need to efficiently focus resources on consumers that represent a disproportionate share of business. But rapidly changing consumer behaviors reinforce the need to also deploy forward-looking insights to identify future sources of growth or disruption, and proactively nurture these spaces before competition arises. This requires brands to develop rapid “test and learn” capabilities to create conviction and action new learning. Otherwise, business owners find themselves chasing new sources of demand and struggling to close a widening gap.

Last year’s playbook no longer applies

In this fluid landscape, it is increasingly challenging for brands and retailers to stay visible and trigger connections at the right time. In the Next Normal, brands can no longer be passive influencers of the experience at the shelf or rely on basic ecommerce search.

Example: Impulse triggers have shifted

The need to connect with consumers at the right time, in the right way, with the right message is even more important given that only 8% of today’s consumers consider themselves brand loyalists, and are highly willing to switch brands or retailers when they see a better offer.

It is critical to understand the relationship between your brand offer and your consumer’s lifestyle. Leading brand owners and retailers are using forward-looking journey insights to map where and how to best sway consumers through brand messages and value added experiences.

How to drive change

Brand owners and retailers need to take action now to ensure they are equipped to win in the Next Normal and beyond. As we’ve seen, the only constant is change: the CPG industry has changed as much over the past three months as in the prior ten years. Four key steps are recommended to configure for an omnichannel Next Normal. Each step is illustrated based on a case example from a leading personal care company that successfully unlocked new pathways to omnichannel growth.

Seurat Group is an insights-driven consumer packaged goods consulting and private equity firm whose mission is to delight consumers. We create for our clients the clarity to act & invest in a better future.

Reach out at info@seuratgroup.com for additional thoughts on building a consumer/shopper insight foundation and omnichannel growth strategy for the Next Normal and beyond.